Irregular Webcomic!

Archive     Blog     Cast     Forum     RSS     Books!     Poll Results     About     Search     Fan Art     Podcast     More Stuff     Random     Support on Patreon
New comics Mon-Fri; reruns Sat-Sun
<   No. 2280   2009-04-24   >

Comic #2280

1 Adam: Want to join my Dungeons & Dragons campaign?
2 Jamie: Sure. Can I be a hobbit?
3 Adam: Well technically they're "halflings", but everyone knows they're just hobbits with the name changed to avoid referencing Lord of the Rings.
4 Jamie: My name will be "Bilbert".

First (1) | Previous (2279) | Next (2281) || Latest Rerun (2383) | Latest New (4875)
First 5 | Previous 5 | Next 5 | Latest 5
Mythbusters theme: First | Previous | Next | Latest || First 5 | Previous 5 | Next 5 | Latest 5
This strip's permanent URL: http://www.irregularwebcomic.net/2280.html
Annotations off: turn on
Annotations on: turn off

Speculate all you want. You're all wrong. No, even you.

Bwahahahaha!


2022-03-26 Rerun commentary: Halflings were originally called "hobbits" in both Chainmail (originally published in 1971), the tactical war game that inspired Dungeons & Dragons, and Dungeons & Dragons itself from its original publication in 1974. This early edition of D&D also included monsters named ents and balrogs.

Tactical Studies Rules, better known as TSR, the company that published these games, also published a board game called Battle of the Five Armies in 1975. The earlier references to hobbits had flown under the radar, but this board game was enough to provoke a cease and desist order from the Tolkien Estate, which also included a claim on rights to the names "hobbit", "ent", "balrog", and also "dwarf, elf, goblin, orc, and some others too" according to Gary Gygax.

TSR's legal team decided to drop publication of Battle of the Five Armies, and also to remove any reference to hobbits, ents, and balrogs from D&D (from the sixth printing in 1977) and from Chainmail (from the fifth edition in 1978). They chose to leave the terms "dwarf", "elf", "goblin", "orc" as they believed the Tolkien Estate did not have an enforceable claim on those terms.

So yes, what Adam says in panel 3 is historically accurate.

LEGO® is a registered trademark of the LEGO Group of companies, which does not sponsor, authorise, or endorse this site.
This material is presented in accordance with the LEGO® Fair Play Guidelines.

My comics: Irregular Webcomic! | Darths & Droids | Eavesdropper | Planet of Hats | The Dinosaur Whiteboard | mezzacotta
My blogs: dangermouse.net (daily updates) | 100 Proofs that the Earth is a Globe (science!) | Carpe DMM (long form posts) | Snot Block & Roll (food reviews)
More comics I host: The Prisoner of Monty Hall | Lightning Made of Owls | Square Root of Minus Garfield | iToons | Comments on a Postcard | Awkward Fumbles
© 2002-2021 Creative Commons License
This work is copyright and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 International Licence by David Morgan-Mar. dmm@irregularwebcomic.net